The new Bentley Blower Continuation is the best hypercar of 2020

Bentley Blower Car Zero Continuation in a garage with the original
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Bentley Blower Car Zero Continuation in a garage with the original
Bentley Blower Car Zero Continuation in a garage with the original
Bentley Blower Car Zero Continuation in a garage
Bentley Blower Car Zero Continuation in a garage
Bentley Blower Car Zero Continuation cockpit
Bentley Blower Car Zero Continuation cockpit
Bentley Blower Car Zero Continuation seats
Bentley Blower Car Zero Continuation engine
Bentley Blower Car Zero Continuation engine

In the 1920s, the Bentley Blower was basically the most coveted hypercar of the era. Hugely sophisticated for its time, there is probably no more respected model in Bentley’s illustrious history than the original 1920’s Blower. What Bentley Mulliner have done is create “car zero”, the prototype for the Blower Continuation Series of which only 12 will be made, and they’re all pre-sold.

Using design drawings and existing jigs from the original it gave the team responsible a head start an ensured accuracy. An original Team Car #2 (Chassis HB 3403, engine SM 3902) was the master model, with every component laser scanned resulting in 1,846 parts being hand crafted to spec while photographs of the original in period helping for accuracy.

The team worked with British specialists and suppliers to manufacture the components and parts, such as the chassis created in heavy-gauge steel, hand-formed and hot riveted by Israel Newton & Sons Ltd, a 200 year old company with a long history of making boilers for steam locomotives and traction engines. Others such as the Vintage Radiator Company created the solid nickel silver radiator shell and hand-beaten steel and copper fuel tank.

Jones Springs Ltd did the leaf springs (no surprises there!) and shackles, headlamps were recreated by Vintage Headlamp Restoration International Ltd, and a new ash frame was created by Lomax Coachbuilders. 

The gloss black bodywork is offset by the Oxblood red Bridge of Weir leather and trim. The seats are stuffed with 10 kg of horsehair, like the original.

But what about that engine? The new Blower gets a new 4.5L engine with a newly machined Amherst Villiers roots-type supercharger with everything else an exact recreation of the original engine, including the magnesium crankcases, that powered Tim Birkin’s four Team Blowers that raced in the late 1920s. The engine test process was an elaborate one, requiring modifications to software and testbed fixtures in order to accomodate the size and dimension of the engine.

The new Blower is now undergoing performance and durability testing at the Nurburgring. Kidding about the ‘ring, although it will undergo track testing as well as 35,000 kms of real world driving which I’d wager none of the 12 pre-purchased will ever reach, collectively.

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