Is the 1825bhp Bugatti Bolide hypercar ready for Le Mans?

Bugatti Bolide hypercar
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Bugatti Bolide hypercar
Bugatti Bolide hypercar
Bugatti Bolide hypercar
Bugatti Bolide hypercar
Bugatti Bolide hypercar
Bugatti Bolide hypercar
Bugatti Bolide hypercar
Bugatti Bolide hypercar
Bugatti Bolide hypercar
Bugatti Bolide hypercar interior
Bugatti Bolide hypercar
Bugatti Bolide hypercar

I’ll see your Valkyrie and raise you a Bolide. Since the launch of the Veyron, Bugatti have never compromised luxury for speed, preferring to appeal to wealthy customers who appreciate not only speed but style and luxury. That’s all out the window now as Bugatti have answered a question burning in their crazy engineering minds: what would happen if they took their 8.0-litre w16 engine, dispensed with all the luxury, and instead focused on pure performance to create a track-focused hyper sports car.

The result of eight months of hard work is the Bugatti Bolide, a 1,850 PS (1361 kW) monster with and 1,850 Nm of torque (achieved when using 110 octane racing fuel), weighing just 1,240 kilograms (theoretical dry weight) giving the car a 0.67 kg per PS weight-to-power ratio. And it’s kind of refreshing to see this is not an electric powered hypercar and that the combustion engine ain’t done yet.

Here are the juicy numbers run as a simulated test: 0-100kph in 2.17 seconds, 0-200kph in 4.36 seconds, and 0-500kph in 20.16 seconds. The rest of the hypercar world had better take note!

Engine improvements and adjustments centre around optimising the car for circuits such as four newly developed turbochargers are fitted with optimised blades, changes to the lubrication system, a change to air-to-air intercooling, and a host of other improvements.

Hauling the car down from its projected top speed of over 500kph are racing brakes with ceramic discs and coatings. Tyres are huge, as you’d expect—340 millimetres on the front and 400 millimetres on the rear, greater even than the Chiron’s 285 mm and 355 mm respectively.

The weight of the vehicle is just as astonishing as the power figures. An F1-like approach to scrutinising every single component took place resulting in things like titanium screw and fastening elements and other hollow, thin-walled functional components, all 3D printed.

Helping keep the weight downed the car rigid is an aerospace-grade carbon fibre monocoque with a rear frame made of high-strength stainless steel.

Bugatti Bolide hypercar

If you hadn’t read about the numbers, the bodywork alone would leave you gobsmacked. The team designed the car to have as little bodywork as possible and the Bugatti design ethos that “form follows performance” is never more evident than with the Bolide.

Sitting 300 millimetres lower than the Chiron, its form is dictated by aerodynamic demands yet somehow still looks evocative.

There are clever things going on with the bodywork as well, such as the outer skin of the intake scoop on the roof morphs depending on the speed of the car providing aerodynamic benefits. 

Interestingly the goal was to also meet the FIA’s safety requirements. This means HANS device compatibility, an automatic fire extinguishing system, a towing device, pressure refuelling with fuel bladder, central locks for the wheels, lightweight polycarbonate windows, and a six-point harness system.  Is this a potential candidate for a Le Mans entry, or a study for a Le Mans entry?

Although there are no plans yet to put this into series production, such are the numbers, such is the demand for these low number hypercars that there will be enough expressions of interest to see the project go live.

Visit Bugatti for more.

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